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Applying for a CRBA
27 MINUTE READ
June 12, 2023

Eligibility for a CRBA

Most, but not all, children born abroad to a U.S. citizen parent are eligible to be documented as U.S. citizens through issuance of a CRBA and U.S. passport. The parents, however, have the burden of proof of establishing that the child is eligible for a CRBA and U.S. passport, and we encourage applicants to read and follow these instructions carefully.

Although the CRBAs and the application forms are the same throughout the world, different embassies and consulates may have different procedures to obtain a CRBA. If you haven’t done so already, please consult the website of your local Embassy or Consulate to learn more about local procedures for applying for a CRBA and for instructions on how to schedule an appointment for this service.

Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) and Surrogacy Abroad

Click here if you are considering coming to Kenya to have a child through use of assisted reproductive technology.

Transmitting Citizenship

Transmission of U.S. citizenship depends on:

At least one parent having the nationality of the United States at the time of the child’s birth;
The existence of a blood relationship between the child and U.S. citizen parent(s);
Documentary evidence demonstrating the U.S. citizen parent(s)’ presence in the United States prior to the child’s birth, as specified below.

If parents are married at time of child’s birth and both are U.S. citizens:
At least one parent must have held residence in the U.S. or its possessions for any length of time.

        • Proof of Residence may include a U.S. drivers license, U.S. marriage certificate, or documents which are considered evidence of physical presence

(This is only for children born on or after January 13, 1941.)

If parents are married at time of child’s birth and only one is a U.S. citizen:
The U.S. citizen parent must have had physical presence in the U.S. or its possessions for at least five years, two of which must be after the age of 14.

(This is only for children born on or after November 14, 1986.)

If parents are unmarried at time of child’s birth, the mother is a U.S. citizen, and the child was born before June 12, 2017:
The mother must have had physical presence in the U.S. or its possessions for one continuous year.

(This is only for children born on or after December 24, 1952.)

If parents are unmarried at time of child’s birth, the mother is a U.S. citizen, and the child was born on or after June 12, 2017:
The mother must have had physical presence in the U.S. or its possessions for at least five years, two of which must be after the age of 14.

If parents are unmarried at time of child’s birth and the father is a U.S. citizen:
The father must have had physical presence in the U.S. or its possessions for five years, two years of which were after the age of 14; and blood relationship established between father and child; and father (unless deceased) agrees in writing, prior to the child turning 18, to support child while child is under age 18. Conditions include:

        • child is legitimated; or
        • father acknowledges paternity under oath; or
        • paternity is established by court adjudication.

(This is only for children born on or after November 14, 1986.)

Examples of Documentation

Some examples of documentary evidence which may be considered to demonstrate that physical presence requirements have been met include (but are not limited to):

        • Wage and tax statements (W-2)
        • Academic transcripts
        • Employment records
        • Rental receipts
        • Records of honorable U.S. military service, employment with U.S. Government or certain intergovernmental international organizations; or as a dependent, unmarried child and member of the household of a parent in such service or employment (except where indicated).
        • U.S. passport stamps may be considered a part of the evidence submitted, but should not be the sole documentary evidence. Drivers’ licenses do not constitute evidence of physical presence.

If you have other children who have been issued with a Consular Report of Birth Abroad, this may be considered as supplemental evidence.

Transmission Requirements

If parents are married at time of child’s birth and both are U.S. citizens:
At least one parent must have held residence in the U.S. or its possessions for any length of time.

        • Proof of Residence may include a U.S. drivers license, U.S. marriage certificate, or documents which are considered evidence of physical presence

(This is only for children born on or after January 13, 1941.)

If parents are married at time of child’s birth and only one is a U.S. citizen:
The U.S. citizen parent must have had physical presence in the U.S. or its possessions for at least five years, two of which must be after the age of 14.

(This is only for children born on or after November 14, 1986.)

If parents are unmarried at time of child’s birth, the mother is a U.S. citizen, and the child was born before June 12, 2017:
The mother must have had physical presence in the U.S. or its possessions for one continuous year.

(This is only for children born on or after December 24, 1952.)

If parents are unmarried at time of child’s birth, the mother is a U.S. citizen, and the child was born on or after June 12, 2017:
The mother must have had physical presence in the U.S. or its possessions for at least five years, two of which must be after the age of 14.

If parents are unmarried at time of child’s birth and the father is a U.S. citizen:
The father must have had physical presence in the U.S. or its possessions for five years, two years of which were after the age of 14; and blood relationship established between father and child; and father (unless deceased) agrees in writing, prior to the child turning 18, to support child while child is under age 18. Conditions include:

        • child is legitimated; or
        • father acknowledges paternity under oath; or
        • paternity is established by court adjudication.

(This is only for children born on or after November 14, 1986.)

Applying for a CRBA in Kenya

Consular Report of Birth Abroad (CRBA)!

Consular Report of Birth Abroad (CRBA) is a formal document certifying the acquisition of United States citizenship at birth for a person born abroad to a U.S. citizen parent or parents who meet the requirements for transmitting citizenship under the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA).  United States non-citizen nationals are also eligible for a Consular Report of Birth Abroad, using the non-citizen option.

CRBA applications must be submitted before the child’s 18th birthday. We recommend that parents apply for the CRBA as soon as possible after the child’s birth.

Eligibility Requirements

To apply, your child must have been born in Kenya or Somalia (this includes Somaliland) and the child and at least one parent must travel to Nairobi for the in-person interview.

To be eligible to apply for a CRBA online, you MUST answer all the following criteria with YES.

  1. Was the child born in Kenya or Somalia (includes Somaliland)
  2. Is the child under the age of 18?
  3. Was at least one parent a U.S. citizen when the child was born?
  4. Can you use an internationally accepted credit/debit card or a direct payment method from a U.S. dollar denominated bank account (also known as “ACH”) to pay online for your Consular Report of Birth Abroad application?
  5. Are you a biological parent of a child born abroad who is applying for that child?

If any of the above statements do not apply to you, you MUST apply by completing a paper application (DS-2029). Please follow the directions in the Service Navigator.

 How to Apply

You can now apply for a CRBA electronically at Embassy Nairobi!  This new online feature allows U.S. citizen parents to complete a CRBA application online, upload all required documents, and submit payment prior to the in-person interview.

  • To apply for a CRBA online, you need to create a MyTravelGov. MyTravelGov is a secured, encrypted portal. Watch this video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NVgRyLQd3jA&t=4s) to learn more about creating your account.
  • Once you have created a MyTravelGov account you can access eCRBA and submit your application online. You must review the necessary documents for the CRBA application in advance by reviewing the instructions on our Service Navigator under CRBA to ensure you are ready for your interview.
  • Once you submit the application, please wait at least 72 hours to schedule an appointment in Nairobi to allow for processing, even if you are immediately directed to the scheduling window. Please Note: Do NOT make another (or duplicate) payment for a CRBA ($100) at the Embassy; if you do, both appointments will be cancelled.
  • Review the Service Navigator to ensure that you are ready for your interview. Failure to have a complete application and provide the required documentation will result in you not being seen for your appointment.
  • Attend your scheduled in-person interview with your original documents and their photocopies (single-sided). You must provide English translations for all foreign language documents. The child must be present at the time of application. Generally, both parents also attend the interview but only one is required.

Need Help?

We are here to help!

 

General Information on DNA Testing and U.S. Citizenship

In order to transmit U.S. citizenship to a child born abroad, among other requirements, there must be a biological relationship between the child and a U.S. citizen parent or parents. Genetic testing is a useful tool for verifying a stated biological relationship in the absence of sufficient other evidence to establish such relationship. Commonly tested relationships that may be used to establish paternity and/or maternity in citizenship claims arising from birth abroad to a U.S. citizen father or mother include father-child, mother-child, child and full brother or sister, child and half brother or sister, and avuncular relationships (child and paternal aunt/uncle/grandparent). DNA testing is the only biological testing method currently accepted by the Department to establish a biological relationship. However, due to the expense, complexity, and logistical delays inherent in parentage testing, genetic testing generally should be used only in the absence of sufficient other evidence (documentation, photos, etc.) establishing the relationship. For more information on the DNA Process, please visit the Department of State Website.

DNA Testing Process in Nairobi, Kenya

        1. DNA test recommended by officer at time of interview.
        2. DNA lab selected by petitioner on AABB web page http://www.aabb.org (costs paid by U.S petitioner/parent). Lab does not have to be near your home. The lab will send kits to a qualified testing center.
        3. DNA lab sends kit to Consular Nairobi.
        4. Applicant will be scheduled an appointment for sample collection and informed of this via email from NairobiDNA@state.gov.
        5. Once applicant receives appointment letter, applicant must then go to IOM office in Gigiri, Nairobi and pay the specimen collection fee (see below) before the DNA appointment day.
        6. On the appointment day, applicant will provide the following items to the Embassy representative: 2 recent passport size photos (2″ x 2″), official photo I.D., a copy of appointment letter and a receipt showing IOM has been paid. Applicants who do not bring all these documents will not be allowed to test.
        7. DNA sample collected on appointment date and sent to the DNA lab for testing.
        8. DNA lab finalizes test and sends results to the consular section.
        9. The Immigration Visa or American Citizen Services section contact the applicants by email/phone and informs them when to return to the embassy.

For more information view the DNA Flow Chart.

Payment of Specimen Collection Fee at IOM

Each applicant being tested is required to pay a specimen collection fee of USD $45.00 per person or the equivalent of USD $40.00 in Kenyan shillings (no Bank fees are charged if payment is made in KSH) at IOM United Nations Crescent off UN Avenue, Gigiri, Nairobi.

        • Payments MUST be made BEFORE the scheduled appointment date to avoid unnecessary delays.
        • Payment for DNA testing is done at IOM Clinic at 78 United Nations Crescent off UN Avenue, Gigiri, Nairobi.
            • Contact Information: 254-020-272-0060 Extension 124 OR 254-020-272-0061 Extension 224 OR 254-020-272-3605 OR 0722-879-680 OR 0734-444-020 OR 0724-256-748
            • DNA Testing will not be performed at the U.S. Embassy if the testing fee is not paid prior to your scheduled appointment.
            • Please retain your payment receipt as the DNA Technician must see it on the day of your appointment.